‘Cutting Edge’ Medicine

Who Needs It?

If you had a life-threatening illness, what would you do? Would you line up for your turn in front of the machines of conventional medicine and hope for the best?

If you had an undiagnosed condition which was destroying your life, would you sit half the day in the waiting room of your designated primary care physician at Loveless Health Care, only to hear, “Well, Mrs. Smith, let’s run some tests.”?

If you’re sub-clinically depressed, you might actually make one of those choices.

But if you have a zest for really living, an unquenchable intellect, and are guided by an indomitable spirit, it’s not likely you’d settle for the drone of conventional medical vernacular which dominates our culture.

In fact, you probably wouldn’t make that choice, regardless of your health care status. Why shouldn’t everyone have access to cutting edge medicine?

 

A Distinction

At the risk of repeating myself, I’d like to clarify that I am not talking about high tech medicine — that’s what conventional medicine prides itself on. High tech medicine is complicated, expensive, and rarely results in truly healthy outcomes. Cutting edge, on the other hand, is simple, elegant, and nearly always results in improved health. It’s vital that this distinction is understood.

For example, hip replacement is expensive high tech medicine with ultimately low quality outcomes. Prolotherapy is a simple, elegant, and healthy solution to the same problem. Compared with hip replacement, its cost is nothing.

And I’ve never seen it not work.

 

Where Does One Look For
Cutting Edge Medicine?

  • Does it come from physicians practicing banal, mediocre ‘standard of care’ practice?
  • Is it promoted by following FDA guidelines — the medicine of bureaucrats?
  • Or does it come from the research labs of Big Pharma?
  • Is cutting edge medicine inspired by legislation?
  • Do insurance companies support cutting edge medicine?

These are the most powerful forces influencing medicine, yet the short answer to each of these questions is an unqualified and emphatic, ‘No’. Cutting edge medicine does not originate from any of these sources. Never has, never will.

Cutting edge medicine comes from clinicians — inspired physicians who are willing and capable of thinking outside the box, and who have an altruistic desire to find better solutions for their patients. Clinicians who are continually digging deeper into the principles of their medicine. Clinicians who never cease the search for new knowledge, new techniques, and new capabilities to creatively express the principles of their medicine in more profound and effective ways.

 

 

Legislation in New Mexico can best serve cutting edge medicine, by giving practitioners of this nature a legal structure through which the medicine can evolve and flourish within the context of truly serving the public who desire and require access to this level of medicine.

This is what our practice act already does, but the practice and the act are continually assaulted by those who are content to plod along, using cookbook medicine endorsed by attorneys, fearful bureaucrats, the ‘bulk’ of the profession, the pharmaceutical empire, and academia — never by intelligent, dedicated, and creative physicians who are doing the actual work of medicine.

If cutting edge medicine is at all attractive to the public, then public servants need to realize where it comes from, and facilitate a framework within which it can flourish.

 

 

 

 

Most Recent Contemplation: Arc of the Sun

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